Timothy Steward & Mary Fowler
Family Tree
 
G5 Timothy Steward
(4th Sept 1762 - 25th June 1836)
= 1794
Mary Fowler
(20th Sept 1765 - 22nd Jan 1837)
 
 
G4 Timothy
(1795-1858)
= 1823
Lucy Tuthill
Thomas Fowler
(1796-1880)
= ?
Isabella Travers ( -1867)
Charles
(1798-1870)
= c.1823
Harriet Steward (1801-1869)
(dau. Ambrose)
Mary Anne
(1799- )
Arthur Steward
(1801-1869)
= 1826
Mary Burton
( - )
Amelia
(1804- )
George
(1805-1844)
 

Timothy Steward, Esq. was a merchant and shipowner. He possessed some of the fastest vessels belonging to the port, when they were much in request before the introduction of steam, to take cargoes of herrings to the Mediterranean and bring back fruit. He married Mary, daughter of John Fowler, Esq., who died in 1837, aged 74. They were both buried in Blundeston Church. There is a portrait of Mr. Steward, when a young man, by Sir William Beechy. There is also a portrait of him by Davis. (ref "The Perlustration")

GEORGE, (hd Cut) 14, Lt G. Hayes. Proportions of the Maria Albertina, T. August 9, 1801. Paid April 3, at the office of Messrs T. and A.H. Steward, Great Yarmouth. Rec. every Monday and Tuesday at the same place. A.H. Steward and Co. Yarmouth Agents.

(note that hd cut = hired cutter)

Also see the extract from "The Perlustration" pp 152-157, below.

Timothy Steward Memorial
Memorial to Timothy and Mary, Blundeston Church, Suffolk
from Gravestone photograph resource
Timothy Steward (G4)
- more detail to come -
From "Bulletins and Other State Intelligence", 1861 [Google Books]

Whitehall, June 5, 1861.

The Queen has been pleased to give and grant unto Peter Finch Steward, an Under Graduate of Trinity College, in the University of Cambridge, youngest son of Timothy Steward, late of Heigham, in the county of the city of Norwich, Gentleman, deceased, by Lucy his wife, daughter of John Scarlin Tuthill, of the said city, Gentleman, by Sarah his wife, who was the daughter of Peter Finch, sometime of the said city of Norwich, Gentleman, also Finch, sometime of the said city of Norwich, Gentleman, also deceased, her Royal licence and authority that he may, in compliance with a direction contained in the last will and testament of Peter Finch, of Norwich aforesaid, Brewer, deceased, take and use the names of Peter Finch only, and drop his present surname of Steward, and also bear the arms of Finch only ; such arms being first duly exemplified according to the laws of arms, and recorded in the Heralds' Office, otherwise the said Royal licence and permission to be void and of none effect:

And also to command that the said Royal concession and declaration be registered in Her Majesty's College of Arms.

Thomas Fowler Steward (G4)
Thomas was a businessman, see for example the entry above on Thomas's brother Timothy.

The Perlustration, vol 2 p 300:

The above-mentioned house (Row 111) is now divided into two occupations, one of which (No. 26) has long been tenanted by Thomas Fowler Steward, Esq..

Mrs. Isabella. Steward, his wife, died there in 1867. She was the daughter of Robert Travers, Esq., of Cork, and a niece of Rear-Adm. Sir Eaton Stannard Travers, KH. Endowed with a vigorous intellect and fertile powers of imagination, Mrs. Steward not only greatly endeared herself by her kindness of heart and ready sympathy to all upon whom she bestowed her much-valued friendship, but also secured for herself an eminent position in the literary world. Her first avowed pub1icaton was Prediction, a work which entitled her at once to take high rank as a novelist. It was published in 1834, and was followed in 1837 by "The Mascarenhas," a legend of the Portuguese in India. Her next novel was "The Interdict," published in 1840, followed eleven years afterwards by "Catharine Erloff" and her last was called "Marguerite's Legacy," published in 1857. Mrs. Stewart was a frequent contributor to the periodical literature of the day; but, although often solicited to do so, declined to attach herself to any particular publication. Her numerous poetical compositions are distinguished alike for paint and pathos. An excellent linguist, with a thorough. acquaintance with the construction of language, she had a peculiar facility of imparting knowledge which made her willing to instruct; and in this respect many of her young relatives and dependants had much reason to be thankfull to her. Although during the latter years of her life Mrs. Steward suffered under the effects of a disease of the heart, yet she retained her mental faculties unclouded to the last; in proof of which it may be stated that shortly before her death she composed the followed epitaph, to be inscribed on her own tomb at the Churchyard of Gunton, Suffolk : -

Go to her grave - wail over her - weep!
Sighs cannot break that motionless sleep.
No breath is upheaved, no dream doth beguile
That fixed, frigid face, of tear or of smile!
But the loud trump, on the gathering day,
Shall wake to new life the slumbering clay!

Charles Steward (G4)
Charles Steward, the third son, commanded an East Indiaman before the highly lucrative trade of the company was thrown open. He resided for many years at Blundeston house; was an active magistrate for Suffolk, and died at the Rectory of his only child, the Rev. C. J. Steward, at Somerleyton in 1870, aged 72. Harriet his widow (daughter of A. H. Steward, Esq.) also died there in 1872, aged 71.
Amelia Steward and John Hector Munro (G4)
See entry above on Amelia's brother Timothy.

Amelia, the younger of the two daughters of Timothy Steward, Esq., married John Hector Munro, Esq, of Walsham-le-Willows, Suffolk, and died leaving an only daughter, who married Frederick Arden, Esq., of the 12th Lancers, eldest son of Joseph Arden, Esq., of Rickmanworth Park, Herts.

George Steward (G4)
See the extract below, from "The Perlustration" for a more detailed account. A more complete version of this story is included in "The Expedition to Borneo of H.M.S. Dido for the Suppression of Piracy", by Henry Keppel & James Brooke, 1846, section VII, "Memoir of Mr. George Steward" (Google Books).

George, the youngest son, was educated at the Grammar School at Norwich, where he formed an acquaintance with James Brooke who became the Rajah of Sarawak. He was placed in the mercantile navy of the East India Company, where one of the private ships was commanded by his brother Capt. Charles Steward, and another by his cousin, Capt. Robert Fowler.

He was killed fighting pirates in Sarawak for Brooke in his thirty-ninth year and unmarried.

George Steward Memorial
Memorial tablet to George's memory in Blundeston Church.
from Gravestone photograph resource
Notes & References
  1. Record from The National Archives
    Deeds of the Martineau family estate, mainly in Walsham le Willows and Stanton Catalogue in Full new page
    Creator(s): Martineau family of Walsham le Willows and Stanton, Suffolk
    section A: THE MAIN ESTATE IN WALSHAM LE WILLOWS, ETC.

    FILE - Assignment of three several terms of 1,000 years - ref. TEM.173/273 - date: 25 May 1848

    Contents
    (i) Jn. Hector Munro, esq., of Walsham le Willows
    (ii) Amelia Helen Munro, spinster, (dau. and only child of (i),) of the same place,
    (iii) Lestock Peach Wilson, Wm. King and Robt. Cotesworth, esq., all of the London Assurance Office, City of London
    (iv) Jn. Coverdale, gent, of Bedford Row, Co. Middlesex.

    In the manor, messuages, etc., (as in the indenture of 29 September 1830) by (i) at the request of (ii) and on the nomination of (iii), to (iv) upon the trusts following:- before execution of the indenture recited in (1) upon the trusts in the said indenture of 29 September, 1830, and afterwards upon trust for (iii), to recover payment of the sum of £11,000 and interest thereon.

    Recites that
    (1) indenture of mortgate, of the same date as the present indenture.
    (2) That the said manor and certain parts of the freehold messuages, lands, tithes, etc., intended to be conveyed by the said recited indenture, are subject to the three several terms of one thousand years created respectively by the indentures of 11 October 1820, 30 August 1821 and 27 October 1819.
    (3) By divers assignments and ultimately by an indenture of 29 September 1830 the manor, messuages, etc., affected by the said three several terms were vested in (i) for all the unexpired residue of the said terms, upon trust for Wm. Pitcairn, Jonathan Brundrett, Andrew Gregory Johnston, Timothy Steward and Thos. Fowler Steward.
    (4) (i) and (ii) are now the only persons beneficially interested in the said manor, and freehold hereditaments.
    (5) By the indenture recited in (1) it was agreed that the unexpired residues of the said three several terms of one thousand years should be assigned by (i) to a trustee nominated by (iii).

    274 (a)
    25 May 1848
    (i) Jn. Hector Munro, esq., of Walsham le Willows
    (ii) Amelia Helen Munro, spinster, of the same place
    (iii) Lestock Peach Wilson, Wm. King and Robt. Cotesworth, esq., all of the London Assurance Office
    (iv) Henry Vallance, esq., of, 20 Essex Street, the Strand, co. Middlesex.

    Mortgate, for £11,000 of the manor, messuages and lands (freehold and copyhold) (as in the indenture of 28-29 September 1830) and lands (as in the second Schedule): messuage, barns, stables, etc., late of Jn. Boldero, decd., in Walsham le Willows, next West Street E. and S.E. and a lane leading from Walsham to Wickenhall, N., abutting W on lands in the first Schedule, W., several pieces of land late also of the said J. Boldero, in Walsham, Stanton and Bardwell, for many years occupied with the same messuage, all formerly in occupation of Robt. Garnham, since of Jn. Garnham, Ezekiel Simpson, - Mills, and late of Robt. Chandler (62.a.0r.10p.) All included in the marginal plan in the indenture of 2 June 1832. Third Schedule gives names of tenants, field-names, acreages, terms of tenancies and rent.

    Recites:
    (1) indenture of 19 October 1825.
    (2) Messuage of Jn. H. Munro and Amelia Steward on 20 October 1825 in the parish church of Gt. Yarmouth.
    (3) As recited in (3) in indenture of 2 June 1828 (endorsed on indenture of 19 October 1825).
    (4) Indenture of 29 September 1830.
    (5) It was subsequently proposed that surrender of the copyholds mentioned in (4) should be to Thos. Fowler Steward only and not in the names of Wm. Pitcairn, Jonathan Brundrett, Andrew Gregory Johnston, Timothy Steward and Thos. Fowler Steward.
    (6) At a court of the manor of Walsham on 20 May 1831 T.F.Steward was admitted to the said copyholds, on the surrender of Mary Sparke and Jn. Sparke, to hold in trust for the said Wm. Pitcairn, Jonathan Brundrett, A.G.Johnston, Tim. Steward and Thos. F. Steward as joint tenants.
    (7) Admission of T.F.Steward at a court of the manor of Walsham Church House, on 20 May 1831, to copyhold of the said manor (as 6), (the lands being as in TEM.173/261/9), with exception of the lands excepted in 264.
    (8) Admission of Wm. Pitcairn, Jonathan Brundrett, A.G.Johnston, Tim. Steward and T.F.Steward, at a court of the manor of Stanton Hall with Mickfields on 24 October 1837, to certain lands and tenements then formerly Lords, at a rent of fourpence, and other lands then formerly Lawrences at a rent of one shilling and elevenpence, one hen and five eggs, valued at one shilling and twopence, consisting of 6a. formerly Mays and a messuage and about 1a., formerly Withers', heretofore of John Buckley, afterwards Thos. Buckley and then late of Jn. Sparke (as in the first Schedule, (copyhold) in the present indenture).
    (9) Indenture of 2 June 1832 (release and bargains and sale); (i) the Rev. Geo. Boldero, the Rev. Hen.Adams and the Rev. Edward Rene Payne (ii) Hester Boldero, wid., (iii) Wm. Pitcairn, Jonathan Brundrett, Andrew Gregory Johnston, Timothy Steward and Thos. Fowler Steward; by which the messuages and lands in the second Schedule of the present indenture were conveyed to (iii) with the copyhold properties described in the same Schedule, for £1,415 paid to (i) by (iii) (£515 being in fact advanced by Jn. Hector Munro).
    (10) Admission of T.F.Steward at a court of the manor of Walsham on 16 May 1834 (on the indenture recited in (9)) to a messuage and 13½a. of copyhold lands, abutting on the highway from Walsham to Thetford N. and on lands then late of Thos. Page E., and lands of Rich. Packer, afterwards of Jn. Grocer, W.; a tenement called Sayes and copyhold lands belonging to it (8a.0r.18p.), in West Street in Walsham, formerly of Thos. Parker; 1½a. of meadow in the Great Meadow, between the meadow theretofore of Sam. Canham N. and the meadow theretofore of Thos. Rampley, gent., S. abutting E. on lands theretofore of Jn. Page, since of Jn. Sparke, gent., decd., and since of Jn. Sparke his son, and W. on the lands called Short Homes, formerly the estate of Edward Seaman (all the copyhold lands comprised in the second Schedule of the present indenture).
    (11) Death of the said Jonathan Brundrett in May 1841.
    (12) Death of Amelia, w. of Jn. H. Munro, before 9 February 1842 (when she was buried at the parish church of Blunderton cum Flixton, co. Suff.).
    (13) There were two children, since of the messuage between Jn. H.Munro and the said Amelia; viz. Amelia Helen, b. 15 October 1826 and baptised at the parish church of Gt. Yarmouth, 1 November 1826, and Emmeline Kate, b. in November 1829.
    (14) The said Emmeline Kate Munro died 15 April 1831 and was buried at Gunton, co. Suffolk.
    (15) Declaration that the said sum of £25,500 being the sum paid for the purchase of the manor, etc., in the indenture of 29th September 1830 and the sum of £900 (part of the before mentioned sum of £1,415, the purchase money for the hereditaments comprised in the indenture of 2 June 1832) making together the sum of £26,400, were raised from the sale of parts of the sums held in bank annuities (as in the indenture of 19 October 1825), with the consent of Jn. H.Munro, and the sum of £1,415 having been paid by the said J.M. Munro out of his own money.
    (16) No appointment of the funds and securities comprised in the said indenture of 19 October 1825, by the said J.H.Munro under the power reserved in that indenture.
    (17) On the decease of the said Amelia Munro, the said Jn. H.Munro and Amelia Helen Munro became the only parties beneficially interested in the trust funds in the last mentioned indenture and in the manor, etc., purchased from the proceeds of sale of the said funds, the said J.H.Munro being entitled to an absolute interest in the capital thereof immediately expectant on the decease of the said J.H.Munro.
    (18) J.H.Munro and Amelia H.Munro are desirous of retaining the said manor, etc., as real estate, and also such proportion of the hereditaments comprised in the indenture of 2 June 1832 as are referable to the said sum of £900.
    (19) The third Schedule annexed to the present indenture containing a rental of the tenants of the properties comprised in the first and second Schedules, but is not intended to qualify or restrict the descritions contained in those Schedules.
    (20) (i) and (ii) having occasion for the loan of the sum of £11,000, have applied to (iii) for the same, with interest at 5%, to be secured by a mortgage of the said manor of North Hall and the messuages, etc., as in the schedules hereto.
    (21) Agreement between (i) and (ii) that the said manor, etc., intended to be surrendered, and the equity of redemption therein should be discharged from the power of appointment contained in the indenture of 19 October 1825 and limited to the uses hereinafter declared (the powers in the indenture of 2 June 1832 are to be extinguished) in respect of any claim of (i) of the said sum of £515, being the sum advanced out of his own monies, so that the said sum may be extinguished in the land. 274 (b)

    Deed endorsed on (a) 23 August 1854
    (i) Lestock Peach Wilson, Wm. King and Robert Cotesworth
    (ii) Charles Douglas, esq., of Witham, co. Essex and Joseph Arden, esq., of Cavendish Square, co. Middlesex
    (iii) Thos. Fowler Steward (iv) Wm. Pitcairn, Tim. Steward and Thos Fowler Steward.

    Recoveyance, for £11,000 of all freehold parts of the said Manor, etc., (as in (a)).
    To (ii) upon the same trusts as in the indenture of 17 May 1850 release by (iii) from the covenants of the indenture of 20 April 1849 for surrendering the copyhold parts of the hereiditaments therein, to the use of (i).

    Recites:-
    (1) indenture of 24 June 1848.
    (2) Indenture of 20 April 1849.
    (3) The said Andrew Gregory Johnston died in March 1850 (bur.18 March 1850 at Portland, Jamaica)
    (4) Indenture of 17 May 1850.
    (5) No surrender has been made to (i) of the copyholds covenanted to be surrendered in the indenture of 20 April 1849 by (iv).
    (6) The sum of £11,000 is still owing to (i) but all interest has been paid.
    (7) (ii) have agreed to pay the sum of £11,000 to (i) who in turn have agreed to convey the freehold parts of the said properties to them.

  2. Record from The National Archives
    Deeds of the Martineau family estate, mainly in Walsham le Willows and Stanton
    FILE - (a) Marriage settlement - ref. TEM.173/266 - date: 19 October 1825

    Contents (i) John Hector Munro Esq., of Keppel St., St. George, Bloomsbury, Co. Middlesex for some time residing at Fritton Hall, Suff. (ii) Amelia Steward, spinster, of Gt. Yarmouth. (iii) Wm. Pitcairn esq., of Tokenhouse Yard, City of London, Jonathan Brundrett, gent., of the Inner Temple London, Timothy Steward, jun., brewer of Norwich, Thos. Fowler Steward, gent, of Gt. Yarmouth.

    Recites: (1) Will of Jn. Munro, Esq., decd., of Keppel Street, proved 9 Jan. 1812, including bequest of £30,000 to J.H.Munro, Wm. Pitcairn and Geo. Rankin, as execs., purchased stocks in accordance with the will during minority of J.H.Munro (£29,510 3% consols, and £28,786.16.2. 3% reduced Bank Anuities);

    (2) on death of Rankin in January 1825 the sums were transferred to Pitcairn and Brundrett, jointly;

    (3) appreciation in the value of the stocks since purchase, therefore the value is now above £30,000;

    (4) After settlement of the claims of the residuary legatees [to the surplus], stocks to £30,000 to be settled on J.H.Munro and Amelia Steward, on their intended marriage, in the name of Wm. Pitcairn, Jonathan Brundrett, Andrew Gregory Johnston, Tim. Steward and Thos. Fowler Steward.

    J.H.Munro now covenants to transfer the said sum to the above trustees, after his marriage and the settlement of the claim of the residuary legatees, and appoints Brundrett and Pitcairn as trustees for the transfer, upon trust for J.H.Munro for life, and afterwards, as to £600 per annum (part of the interest) for the use of the said Amelia Steward for life, or in the event of her remarriage, £300 per annum; subject to the charge as above the capital sum to be held by the trustees in trust for the children of the said intended marriage, to be vested in them equally at age of 21 years (or at marriage, of daughters, whichever is earlier), during their respective minorities to be applied to their education and maintenance; in default of children or of their death under twenty one years (if daughters, also unmarried) then in trust for the will of J.H.Munro, or in default, for persons named by Mary Mitchison, wife of Jn. Mitchison, silk warehouseman, of Palmer Terrace, Upper Islington, Middlesex by decd, or will and for her use for life; in the event of Amelia Steward surviving J.H.Munro (then being no surviving children) £2,000 of the said trust funds to be held in trust for the said Amelia to the uses of her deed or will; the trustees empowered to sell stocks and to purchase others, or to purchase any Manors, messuages or lands (freehold, copyhold or leasehold) not more than one quarter to be copyhold, ditto leasehold (the leases to be for a term not less than 60 years), with power for J.H.Munro or his trustees after his decease to demise any of the properties for terms not exceeding 21 years, and power to resell or exchange; the arrangements for the said Amelia Steward to be in lieu of all claims to dower.

    Two Receipts for £17,518.5.0d 3% Consols. dated 2 June 1828, attached.

    (b) Endorsement, 2 June 1828; Declaration by Wm. Pitcairn, Jonathan Brundrett, Tim. Steward and Thos. Fowler Steward that £17,518.5.0d 3% consols and £17,518.5.0d 3% reduced Bank Anuities are held by them in trust for the purposes in the indenture above;

    Recites:
    (1) That the marriage between J.H.Munro and Amelia Steward took place 'soon after' the execution of the indenture of 1818

    (2) Settlement 'by amicable adjustment' in favour of J.H.Munro, of the question the share of the residuary legatees

    (3) Transfer of the capital sums above mentioned, on the date of this declaration, to the said trustees (Andrew Gregory Johnston being omitted under the rules of the Bank of England for registration of transfers in four names only, and as he 'may shortly leave England for the West Indies')

    (b) Endorsement, reciting indenture of 12 Nov. 1841.

    (c) Endorsement, reciting indenture of - August 1843.

  3. This extract from "The Perlustration of Great Yarmouth" also links the Yarmouth family to Wells-next-the-Sea and provides some fascinating insights into the family.

    THE PERLUSTRATION OF GREAT YARMOUTH, vol 2, pp 152 to 157

    Row No. 96, from South Quay to Middlegate Street, anciently called Wildgres' North Row and afterwards Fuller's North Row; also Old Meeting House South Row...

    ... the old house was burnt to the ground; and in 1800 the site purchased by Timothy Steward Esq., who erected on part thereof the house (No. 17) which he afterwards sold to the Rev. B. W. Salmon, and on the remaining part he built in 1811 a house (No. 16) for his own abode, and in which he resided until his death in 1836, aged 74.

    There are numerous and distinct families of the name of STEWARD, which is derived from the office so called. During the middle ages religious houses, nobles, lords of manors, and corporations, all had stewards to manage their affairs. The Stewards of Scotland were named from the office which they held under the crown until they attained, to regal power themselves; (note 1) when the name became changed to Stewart, and finally to Stuart.

    The name of Steward is not found in our local records until 1642, when a Mr. Steward contributed two silver tankards and a considerable quantity of plate to be coined into money for the use of the Parliament; but there is no reason to suppose that he was connected with the family now under consideration.

    The mother of Oliver Cromwell was a Steward; descended, it is asserted, from Sir John Steward, who accompanied Prince James of Scotland into England circa 1402. A branch of this family settled at Wells- next-the-sea. Robert Steward, who was born there, was Prior of Ely in 1522, and was one of the few divines who had the courage to uphold the legality of the marriage of Henry VIII. with Catherine of Arragon. He surrendered his convent in 1539, and became the first Dean of Ely. He always asserted that his ancestors came from Scotland to England temp. Henry IV., and that after performing marvellous deeds in France, finally settled at Upwell in Norfolk; but it seems that a family of this name had resided in that locality as far back as the reign of Richard II. Nicholas Steward of Wells descended, according to Noble, from the above-named Sir John Steward, died there circa 1520.

    From him descended, it is said, Timothy Steward of Wells, who was born there in 1696, and came to Yarmouth, where he married Hannah, only child of Christopher Harbord (as mentioned in vol i., p. 248) (see Timothy (G7) below), and with her acquired some property in the town; and became the founder of a family who attained to considerable wealth and importance. He died in 1769, aged 73, leaving a son, Timothy Steward, to whom his uncle, Tobias Harbord, left a ship called the Two Brothers. This Timothy Steward commanded a private vessel of war called the Dreadnought, with which, in 1781, he captured a Swedish vessel named the Sophia, on her passage from Stockholm to Bordeaux, and brought her into Yarmouth where she was condemned as a lawful prize. This gave rise to a suit in the High Court of Admiralty, which was decided in favor of Capt. Steward. He died in 1793, aged 60. By Mary his wife, daughter of Ambrose Palmer, who died in 1829, aged 89, he had three surviving sons — William, Timothy, and Ambrose Harbord.

    Of the eldest we shall have occasion to speak presently; the youngest has already been noticed. Timothy Steward, Esq., the second son, who built and resided in the above-mentioned house, was a merchant and shipowner. He possessed some of the fastest vessels belonging to the port, when they were much in request before the introduction of steam, to take cargoes of herrings to the Mediterranean and bring back fruit. (note 2) He married Mary, daughter of John Fowler, Esq. (ante. p. 119.) (sister of Thomas Fowler, Esq., of Gunton Hall), who died in 1837, aged 74. They were both buried in Blundeston Church. There is a portrait of Mr. Steward, when a young man, by Sir William Beechy. There is also a portrait of him by Davis. [Timothy and Mary were also the parents of Arthur]

    Timothy Steward, the eldest son of the above marriage, was, when a youth, a Lieutenant in the Yarmouth Yeomanry Cavalry. He became a principal partner in the brewery firm of Steward, Patteson, and. Co., and resided for many years at Heigham Lodge, near Norwich, where he died in 1858, aged 63. He filled the office of Sheriff of Norwich in 1856.

    Charles Steward, the third son, commanded an East Indiaman before the highly lucrative trade of the company was thrown open. He resided for many years at Blundeston house; (note 3) was an active magistrate for Suffolk, and died at the Rectory of his only child, the Rev. C. J. Steward, at Somerleyton in 1870, aged 72, where also died Harriet his widow (daughter of A. H. Steward, Esq.) in 1872, aged 71.

    George, the youngest son, was educated at the Grammar School at Norwich, then ably conducted by Dr. Valpy, where he formed an acquaintance which powerfully influenced his future career. Evincing an early predilection for the sea, he was placed in the mercantile navy of the East India Company, one of the private ships in which service was commanded by his brother,. Capt. Charles Steward, and another by his cousin, Capt. Robert Fowler, but before he became eligible for a similar command, this huge monopoly was broken up. Finding no field for enterprise at home he, in 1843, joined a brother officer, Mr. Henry Wise, in fitting out a vessel; and proceeding in her to Sarawak, was cordially received by an old school fellow, James Brooks, who was then exercising supreme power there as Rajah. The Bornean Seas at that time swarmed with pirates and a determination was taken to put them down by force. For this purpose Rajah Brooke applied for assistance from H.M.S. Dido,. then commanded by a Norfolk mat, Sir Harry Keppel, and a boat expedition was decided on, in which Steward joined as a volunteer, and commanded a party of friendly Malays and Dyaks. After attacking some strong forts at the entrance of the river, the boats proceeded for twenty miles up the country destroying the strongholds of the pirates on both sides as they went along. On the following morning, Steward obtained permission to go ahead with the light native boats, but with an injunction to proceed cautiously and to fall back on the appearance of an enemy. In about a quarter of an hour the war yells of the pirates were heard, mingled with the report of fire-arms. Keppel immediately pushed forward, and soon found that the foremost boat, commanded by Steward, had been too daring, for she had been attacked by an overwhelming force consisting of six large war-boats, each containing from fifty to sixty men. When last seen, says Brooke (who was present with the British force), Steward was endeavouring to board the enemy, but his own boat sunk under him, and every soul on board, sixteen in number, perished. As soon as the Dido's boats could get up, the pirates were attacked and ultimately defeated with great loss. The boats then went farther up the river, and completely destroyed the town aid capital of Karaugau. At the time of the above fatal occurrence, Mr George Steward was in his thirty-ninth year and unmarried. There is a mural tablet to his memory in Blundeston Church. (note 4) Amelia, the younger of the two daughters of Timothy Steward, Esq., married John Hector Munro, Esq, of Walsham-le-Willows, Suffolk, and died leaving an only daughter, who married Frederick Arden, Esq., of the 12th Lancers, eldest son of Joseph Arden, Esq., of Rickmanworth Park, Herts. A hatchment with the arms of Steward, as granted to the Yarmouth family by Sir Isaac Heard, Garter, hangs in the Parish Church. [see opposite and footnote 1]

    Footnotes:

    1. Families of this name still hear for their arms a fesse chequé, in allusion to the chequered board anciently used by accountants. The arms confirmed to the Yarmouth family by authority are—quarterly or. and arp, on a fesse sa., three fleur-de-lis of the first; in the first and fourth quarters a fesse chequé of the second and third; and in the second and third quarters a lion ramp. gu., debruised by a bend raguly or.; and for a crest, on a mount vert. within a crown vallery or., a lion ramp. gu.
    2. The following anecdotes testify to the bravery of Yarmouth men in the merchant service. In 1800 Mr. Steward had a ship called the Lord Petre, Hezekiah Martin, commander, which, on a voyage from Mogadore to London, was captured by two Spanish privateers and carried into Camarino, a port near Cape Finisterre;
      "not without a good deal of bloodshed," says the captain in a letter to his owner, "for I had two men killed and three wounded. When they first boarded we cleared the deck of every man, some going overboard; and the second time they came up we did the same again. We still steered our course, but after four hours constant firing I was obliged to give up the vessel. I am wounded myself through the thigh. Captain McFarlane, whom I had on board as a passenger with his wife was killed. They lost their vessel at Mogadore, and I gave them a passage. My mate was killed, and I have another man that I am afraid will not live as he has got two balls in his head. When we landed in the place, the cries of the people were shocking to see our situation. Our vessel was nothing but blood all over. I should not have given the ship up had not two privateers come down upon us when I was wounded by swivel shot through my thigh, and two men lay dead on the deck, and two more wounded out of eight in all.”

      Capt. Martin had a narrow escape, for besides the serious wound he mentions, a ball passed quite through his hat. He was of an old Yarmouth family and died at Southtown ín 1828, aged 60.

      Mr Steward had another vessel called the Eve, which in 1804 was captured by a French privateer. All the crew were taken out except the mate, named Piggin, and a boy; and six Frenchmen and three Americans were put on board the prize. When half way to Holland, Piggin proposed to one of the Americans to seize the ship and take her back to Yarmouth, to which he assented, and when the rest of the crew were below and Piggin at dinner with the prize master, this man put down and locked the hatch; upon hearing which Piggin rose from the table, seized the prize master, and told him be was a prisoner. Th latter snatched up a pistol and snapped it at Piggin, but it missed fire, and the man surrendered; and then Piggin -with the assistance of the American, brought this ship, into Yarmouth with their prisoners in her hold.

      An almost simi1ar instance occurred in the case of the Rapid, one of Mr. Steward’s fast ships. On the same day be heard that she had. been captured by the French, and that she had arrived safe at Malta. Subsequent letters explained the mystery. She had been captued in the Mediterranean, and her captain (Miller), a lady passenger, and all her crew, except the mate, were taken out of her and sent to Marseilles. A prize-master and crew were put on board the Rapid, her mate, a young man named Jex, being left to assist in navigating her Among the prize-crew were a Dane and a Hamburgher neither of whom, as Jex discovered, had much liking for the French service; and with them he planned a rescue. One day Jex, watching his opportunity, felled the prize-master to the deck with a handspike, his confederates seized the man at the wheel, and the rest of the crew being below were secured by fastening the hatches. The Rapid was then taken into Malta, and delivered up to the British authorities. Jex, on his return to Yarmouth, was made master of another vessel built by Mr. Steward, but he lived a few years only.

    3. The beauties of this charming spot have already been mentioned (see vol. i, p. 170). The lordship of Blundeston and the advowson, were at one time the property of the Patons, from whom they passed to the Sydnors, and from them to the Allens and Anguishes of Somerleyton, and were never severed until their sale by Lord Sydney Godolphin Osborne. The present rector is the Rev. Robert Woolmer Gory, third son of Robert Cory, Jun., Esq. see ante p. 33, where it is stated that the widow of Dr. Cory, the second son, married Thomas Woodthorpe. This is an error. Mrs. Cory married William Woodthorpe, Esq., of Clarlton Colville, where the family have held am estate for nearly two centuries. The site of Blundeston house was in 1627 the property of Sir Butts Bacon, Bart., seventh son of Sir Nicholas Bacon of Redgrave, Bart., who was the direct ancestor of the present representative of that ancient family. The late Mr. Charles Steward made very extensive collections towards an illustrated history of the hundred of Lothingland; and also possessed a valuable ornithological museum.
    4. Steward fell in a truly-glorious cause. "A visitor to Sarawak," says a recent traveller "who knew its former state, may well be struck with its flourishing condition, and with the aspect of peace, plenty, and security, which now pervades a place so short a time back a prey to lawlessness, rapine, and bloodshed. No portion of the globe could have been more wretched than this territory; when pirates and robbers swept the country with fire and sword; when murderous head-hunters sought for their bleeding trophies far and near; when savage tribes sought opportunities of making a raid upon the least protected of their neighbours, murdering all the males and leading the females into captivity. Such was the reign of terror, and worse than civil war, which Brooke found existing in this part of Borneo, Far from the seat of even nominal government, the strong hand kept down the weak with the ferocity of the savage and without appeal; and as a necessary result the country was becoming depopulated; for those who escaped the kris of the enemy could only look to die of starvation. Having with a mighty effort given such a blow to piracy that it has never been able to lift its head since, and having fairly scratched if not killed the snake, Brocke thus essentially mitigated the great crying evil of that part of the world, and paved the way for improvements, which the natives readily appreciated and soon sensibly adopted. He succeeded in winning the entire confidence of the population, and by his own indomitable will and enthusiastic nature, backed by no state support or military force, changed this desolated district into a thriving settlement, well governed and secure, where every man sits under his own vine and under his own fig-tree none daring to molest him” Cuthbert Collingwood, p202. He might have added that the head-house in which the skulls of slaughtered enemies were kept has now given place to a church, where the doctrines of Christ are preached.