Family Passengers
NameAgeFromProfession/Notes
TaylorEdward39SuffolkLabourer
(Ordered to pay at the rate of 1 per month or 12 weeks imprisonment. First payment on 26 March '78)
Annie37
Elizabeth18Servant
Antony17*
Kate16Servant
Thomas11
Lillian9
* Anthony was 'smuggled' out of England by Edward
Ship_Cardigan_Castle
The Cardigan Castle
The Voyage, 1873
The Cardigan Castle departed from London on 23rd August 1873 and arrived at Lyttelton on 15th November 1873, having done the distance in 84 days. (On her only other voyage she left for Lyttelton on September 28, 1876, arriving there on January 6 of the following year, taking an even 100 days.)

The Captain on both voyages was Captain Davies and Surgeon Superintendent Dr Bain DSE.

From White Wings - Sir Henry Brett:

ARRIVAL OF THE SHIP CARDIGAN CASTLE, FROM LONDON
The Press Monday November 17th 1873

The third ship under the auspices of the New Zealand Shipping Company, arrived in harbour on Saturday, and anchored off the town at 1pm after a smart passage of 84 days from anchorage to anchorage, and 79 days from the Lizard to the ?. At 2 pm the Health Officer and the Commissioners left the wharf in the SS Mullagh, and on arriving alongside the ? inquiries having been made, they proceeded on board and made the statuary inquiries having been made, they proceeded on board to make the usual inspection.

The ship, which is built of iron, is certainly a very fine model, and although she was evidently not intended for a passenger trade, yet she is most admirably adapted for the conveyance of emigrants; her 'tween decks are lofty and well ventilated, the berths were well placed, and in fact the arrangements throughout for the welfare of the emigrants seemed to have been strictly adhered to (a fault which is decidedly on the right side appeared to be that there were too few passengers considering the capabilities of the ship). On going through the various compartments and making strict inquiries there were no complaints, and all seemed to have enjoyed themselves very well, and spoke in the highest terms of the Captain and his wife, the Surgeon-Superintendent and wife, and the officers throughout the ship. The hospital and berth accomodation has been very good. The cooking galley, although somewhat small, has acted well during the voyage. The condenser, which is a very large one, has acted well, and has supplied every requirement. The ship, which is certainly a very fine model, was built three years since by Messers R and J Evans, Liverpool. She has a small but well apportioned cabin, and has a good poop deck. Her lower deck is all that could be wished for, and looked uncommonly clean. She has immense beam, and the height of her 'tween decks was 9ft 3in.

We are indebted to Captain Davies for the following report:- Left Plymouth on August22nd, and the Lizards on the night of the 28th; had bad weather through the Bay of Biscay and light N E trades, crossing the line on the 26th day out. The S E trades for the greater part were light. Sighted the Canaries on September 4th, and Cape de Virde on the 9th. The eastings were run down in 40 deg to 47 deg. Sighted Tristan d'Acuna on October 5th; passed the meridian of the Capeon the night of the 14th October, and was off Tasmania on November 4th passed and the Snares on the 11th; was off Oamaru on the 13th; had light southerly winds to arrival, having made the passage from anchorage to anchorage in 84 days; from land to land in 79 days. The ship carries an increased spread of canvas, and with good winds must sail well.

The following is the account of her running from the meridian of the Cape of Good Hope to Tasmania, 14th October to November 4th:- October 14th 212,212, 256, 267, 197, 208, 234, 282, 294, 295, 275, 268, 290, 263, 312, 277, 266, 278, 216, 277, 300 and 253 miles per diem - 11 knots.

We had omitted to state that the emigrants who consist of English, Sweden and danes, appear to be remarkably healthy, and were under the care of of Surgeon Superintendent Dr Bain; the single girls were under the care of matron Mrs Kiddell, and sub-matron Miss Wright. The latter receive excellent characters for the way in which they have conducted themselves. Their berths, and in fact the whole ship from fore to aft, are patterns of cleanliness. By the energy displayed by the agents and seconded by the railway authorities, the whole of the immigrants were landed on Saturday afternoon, and sent on to the barracks at Addington.

In the 1870's, in order to promote immigration and to gauge the effects of increased advertising in the Home Country, the Colonial Government undertook a number of interviews with arriving immigrants. A number of set questions were asked and the responses to these were recorded by immigration officers throughout the country. The questions explored the reasons for persons deciding to emigrate, the ease with which this occurred, their treatment during the journey and their recommendations for the future promotion of New Zealand as an emigrant destination. They make for interesting reading.


Interview with William Warman
Emigrant passenger by the ship Cardigan Castle to Lyttelton in 1873

The following are the responses of William Warman who travelled to Canterbury with his wife and four children (one of whom travelled in the Single Women's section).

Questions William's Responses
What is your name and condition - (ie married or single)? William Warman - plasterer - married - 3 children
Where do you come from? Brighton
What first induced you to think of New Zealand for emigration? If advertisements state in what paper? If local Agent state name and address if possible? Work was very bad and I had a family of young children and very poor wages. I heard from people in New Zealand that wages were very good there and work plentiful.
When you made up your mind what steps did you take? I applied to Mr Gardiner, local Agent at Brighton. He answered my questions and wrote to Agent General for me.
Did you pay your own passage to the port of departure? I paid 1 and gave a promissory note for 2.10.0 advanced to me.
Had you any communication in London with the Agent General or his office? I wrote to the Agent General direct about my fare to Plymouth. All other matters were carried on through Mr Gardiner.
Were you detained at the port waiting for the ship and did you receive maintenance money and how much? Detained nearly a week at Plymouth
Have you any remarks to make with regards to the promotion of emigration at home? Let emigrants write home describing the Country truthfully and also a description of their treatment on board ship and after arrival in New Zealand. Let these letters be published in English papers and also circulate Colonial papers, giving accounts of arrival of emigrant ships, engagement of immigrants etc. I find the description of the Country given by Mr Gardiner to be very truthful.

Interview with John Mintrom
Emigrant passenger by the ship Cardigan Castle to Lyttelton in 1873

The following are the responses of John Mintrom who travelled to Canterbury with his wife and nine children (two of whom were in single accommodation).

Questions John's Responses
What is your name and condition - (ie married or single)? John Mintrom - Brickmaker - married - 9 children.
Where do you come from? Jersey Channel Islands
What first induced you to think of New Zealand for emigration. If advertisements state in what paper. If local Agent state name and address if possible. I saw a New Zealand paper with account of wages etc there and the demand for my trade.
When you made up your mind what steps did you take? I applied to Dr Garrick, local Agent at St Hilliers, Jersey. He has lived for several years in New Zealand and gave me every information about the Colony and the steps necessary to take to obtain a passage.
Did you pay your own passage to the port of departure? I paid my way.
Had you any communication in London with the Agent General or his office? No
Were you detained at the port waiting for the ship and did you receive maintenance money and how much? There is no difficulty in the way of any Jersey people obtaining passages if they are willing to come. Dr Garrick makes everything easy. The dread of the voyage stops a great many from coming. I shall write describing our treatment on the voyage. It was much better than I expected.
Have you any remarks to make with regards to the promotion of emigration at home? There is no difficulty in the way of any people obtaining passages if they are willing to come. Dr Garrick makes everything easy. The dread of the voyage stops a great many from coming. I shall write describing our treatment on the voyage. It was much better than I expected.

Immigration Office: J E March

Christchurch: 30 Nov. 1873 Immigration Officer

The Ship
Passenger List
Notes & References
  1. Website of Denise & Peter